Workshop Writers’ Work 2017

 

DSCF89Bourne to Write is a writing community that currently numbers over 40 writers from the weekly Eastbourne and Lewes Creative Writing Workshops. Bourne to Write published its first anthology, ‘Strangers in Paradise’ in 2014 and it is now also available as a Kindle book on amazon worldwide. A Kindle book entitled  ‘Short and Curly’ featuring short pieces of homework and timed exercises by our writers is also available on amazon.

Buy the Strangers in Paradise Kindle book on Amazon.co.uk

Buy the Short & Curly Kindle book on Amazon.co.uk

In this section we share the writers’ weekly homework pieces and timed exercises. Homework is normally 500 words maximum, the timed exercises are completed in the workshop within 20 minutes.

Read our tips on writing timed exercises…

Read Chekhov on writing…

Six Common Endings in Fiction…

Everything you never wanted to know about Grammar 

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September

For this week’s homework I read from the 1841 short story The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe.  Often cited as the first detective story, the character of Dupin became the prototype for many future fictional detectives, including Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. The story is distinctive from a general mystery in that the focus is on analysis. It’s also the first ‘locked room’ mystery. Like the Sherlock Holmes stories its narrated by the eccentric amateur sleuth’s accomplice. 
I asked our writers to open their homework piece with this line from the story.
‘We first met when we were trying to find the same book.’

The Same Page by Steve Brown 

Read Steve’s piece

We First Met by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece 

We First Met by Dave Perry

Read Dave’s piece

Harmony by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

A Fleeting Meeting by Jill Webb

Listen to Jill reading her piece

The Ambassador’s Wife by Chris Robinson 

Read Chris’s piece

It started with a Book by Gill Kane  

Read Gill’s piece 

Grit gets in your eyes by Christina Buchanan 

Listen to Christina’ piece

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For this week’s homework I read from the classic short story, ‘The Open Boat’ by Stephen Crane. I then asked our writers to open their piece with the first line from the story: None of them knew the colour of the sky.

The Battle of Carabobo by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

The Sky is Blue by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece 

None of them knew the Colour of the Sky by Lesley Dawson 

Read Lesley’s piece

The Colour of the Sky by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

Keep Calm and Have a Camomile by Jill Webb

Listen to Jill reading her piece

The Colour of the Sky by Chris Robinson 

Read Chris’s piece

The Colour of the Sky by Martin Bourne  

Listen to Martin’s piece 

The Last Ticket by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece 

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For the homework I read from Mickey Spillane’s first novel ‘I the Jury’ published in 1947. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I,_the_Jury Here’s the complete 1953 film on Youtube, by the time this film was made the book had sold 3.5million copies.
I asked our writers to open their homework with the first two lines from the novel.
I shook the rain from my hat and walked into the room. Nobody said a word.

The Pseudo Gambler by Stella Newing

Read Stella’s piece

Larry King by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

I Shook the Rain form my Hat by Stuart Carruthers 

Read Stuart’s piece

Where Were You Last Week by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

Me Nosy? by Jill Webb

Listen to Jill reading her piece

I Shook the Rain from my Hat by Lesley Dawson

Read Lesley’s piece

Eavesdropping by Dave Perry  

Listen to Dave’s song

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August

For this week’s homework I read from Hemingway’s For Whom The Bell Tolls.
I then asked our writers to open their homework with this line: I had an inheritance from my father.

 

An Inheritance by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

An Inheritance by Lawrence Howard

Read Lawrence’s piece

An Inheritance by Zoe Hitchcock

Read Zoe’s piece

An Inheritance by Joan Needham 

Read Joan’s piece

My Inheritance by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read from the brilliant novel Nutshell by Ian Mcewan.

I then asked our writers to write about a character who has been eavesdropping…

Moving On by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

For Sale – a timed exercise by Lawrence Howard

Read Lawrence’s piece

Eavesdropping by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

The End by Stuart Carruthers

Listen to Stuart’s piece

Mystic Norman by Ellis Goodwin 

Listen to Ellis perform his piece

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For the homework I read from Papillon by Henri Charriere, probably one of the greatest ‘escape’ and ‘endurance’ memoirs ever written. I then asked everyone to write a piece about someone who is wrongly accused.

False Accusation by Dave Perry 

Read Dave’s piece

The Accused Husband by Martin Bourne

Listen to Martin’s piece

Who Had Me Cake? by Jill Webb

Listen to Jill reading her piece

Wrongly Accused by Lawrence Howard

Read Lawrence’s piece

A Little Misunderstanding by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

Falsely Accused by Zoe Hitchcock

Read Zoe’s piece

Falsely Accused by Penny Humphrey 

Read Penny’s piece

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for this week’s homework I read from the magnificent ‘Fugitive Pieces’ by Anne Michaels.
I asked the writers to open their homework with the first line of the second paragraph.

No one is born just once.

No One is Born Just Once by Dave Perry 

Listen to Dave performing his song

Reborn by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

No One is Born Just Once – Discuss by Jill Webb

Listen to Jill reading her piece

Do Unto Others by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

Past Lives by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

Little Deaths by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

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July

For this week’s homework I read from Victor Hugo’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame. In the preface Hugo talks about how he was inspired by the word ANArKH, which he saw carved into one of the walls of the cathedral. This roughly translates as ‘Fate’. I asked the writers to base their homework on a piece of graffiti, however like Hugo’s inspirational word it had to be carved or scratched into a surface.

The Oak Tree by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

Graffiti by Miriam Silver

Read Miriam’s piece

Graffiti by Lesley Bourne

Read Lesley’s piece

What are the Chances? by Jill Webb

Listen to Jill reading her piece

Graffiti by Dave Perry 

Read Dave’s piece

Vineyard by Lawrence Howard

Read Lawrence’s piece

The Border between Truth and lies by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

Dry Stone Wall by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

Graffiti by Mia Sundby

Read Mia’s piece

Acronyms – a timed exercise by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

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For this week’s we discussed Hilary Mantel’s’ recent Reith lectures on BBC Radio 4. I then gave the writers this line from Bringing up the Bodies: “What is the nature of the border between truth and lies? 

Truth and Lies by Zoe Hitchcock

Read Zoe’s piece

Deception by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

Truth or Lies by Ray Dale

Read Ray’s piece

The Border by Poppy Humphrey  

Read Poppy’s piece

Man’s Best Friend by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

Ghost by Paul Hitchman

Read Paul’s piece

The Ends we Deserve by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

Death by Zoe Hitchcock

Read Zoe’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read the lyrics of ‘Words’ by the Colorado based singer/songwriter, Gregory Alan Isakov.
 
I then gave our writers the first line of the song as the title for their piece: Words mean more at night

Written at Night by Des Holden 

Read Des’s piece

Words Mean More at Night by Ellis Goodwin

Read Ellis’s piece

Words at Night by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

Words Mean More at Night by Mia Sundby

Read Mia’s piece

Words Mean More at Night by Lawrence 

Read Lawrence’s piece

Words Mean More at Night by Katy Wise

Read Katy’s piece

The Dark Night by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece

Words Mean More at Night by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

Words at Night by Izzy Holden

Listen to Izzy’s piece

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For this week homework I read from The Rotters’ Club by Jonathan Coe.
I then gave our writers the last line of the novel as the opening line for their piece.
“All right then, now it’s your turn.”

 

One of Those Days by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

The Waves by Meredith Shepard

Read Meredith’s piece

Upside Down by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

Poetic Justice by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

All Right Then by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

The Horse by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

All Right Then by David Perry

Read David’s piece

Make Tea Not War by Susan Tracy

Read Susan’s piece

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June

For this week’s homework I read from My Cousin Rachel by Daphne de Maurier and asked our writers to open their homework with this line:
 
“How soft and gentle her name sounds when I whisper it. 
 
Here’s the quote in full:
 
“How soft and gentle her name sounds when I whisper it. It lingers on the tongue, insidious and slow, almost like poison, which is apt indeed. It passes from the tongue to the parched lips, and from the lips back to the heart. And the heart controls the body, and the mind also. Shall I be free of it one day? In forty, in fifty years? Or will some lingering trace of matter in the brain stay pallid and diseased? Some minuscule cell in the bloodstream fail to race with its fellows to the fountain heart? Perhaps, when all is said and done, I shall have no wish to be free. As yet, I cannot tell.” 

 

Here We Glow by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

The Disappearance by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

Revolucion Marcista by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

How Soft and Gentle by Debbie Holden

Read Debbie’s piece

How Gentle by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

Sweet Nothings by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece 

Esther by Penny Humphrey

Read Penny’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read the poetry of Ocean Vuong.
I then asked for the writers to open their homework with this line:  I wanted to disappear.
Here’s the source piece by Ocean Vuong.
I wanted to disappear — so I opened the door to a stranger’s car. He was divorced. He was still alive. He was sobbing into his hands (hands that tasted like rust). The pink breast cancer ribbon on his keychain swayed in the ignition. Don’t we touch each other just to prove we are still here? I was still here once. The moon, distant & flickering, trapped itself in beads of sweat on my neck. I let the fog spill through the cracked window & cover my fangs. When I left, the Buick kept sitting there, a dumb bull in pasture, its eyes searing my shadow onto the side of suburban houses. At home, I threw myself on the bed like a torch & watched the flames gnaw through my mother’s house until the sky appeared, bloodshot & massive. How I wanted to be that sky — to hold every flying & falling at once.

The Disappearing Art by Steve Brown

Read Steve’s piece

Cloudy with some Sun by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

The Disappearance by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

Far Beyond the Stars by Ellis Goodwin 

Listen Ellis reading his piece

How to Disappear by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

I Wanted to Disappear by Rosalind May

Read Ros’s piece

 

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For this week’s homework I read from Purity by Jonathan Franzen.
I then asked our writers to open their homework piece with this line from the novel:
You need closeness with other people. And how is closeness built? By sharing secrets.

Against Purity by Steve Brown

Read Steve’s piece

The Tatoo of Us by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

Secrets by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

Memories for Sale by Ellis Goodwin 

Listen Ellis reading his piece

To Share or Not to Share by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

Secrets by Ray Dale

Read Ray’s piece

You Need Closeness by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

Mistaken Identity Twice – a timed exercise by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

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For the homework I read My Father’s Brain from Jonathan Franzen’s essay collection How to be Alone. I then asked our writers to open their homework piece with the first line from the article:
Here’s a memory.

 

Here’s a Memory by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

Memories by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

Here’s a Memory by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

Unoriginal Sin by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

Here’s a Memory by Lawrence Howard

Read Lawrence’s piece

Here’s a Memory  by Valerie Howard 

Read Valeries’s piece

An Antique Discovery by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

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May

For this week’s homework I read from The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton.

I asked our writers to open their piece with this line from the novel:
Nothing here is more fabulous than the truth.

 

Knickers to You by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

The Long Road North by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece 

Nothing More Fabulous by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

The Truth by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

Memory –  a timed exercise by Rosalind May

Read Ros’s piece

Memory –  a timed exercise by Lawrence Howard

Read Lawrence’s piece

A Lost Memory –  a timed exercise by Flora Dora

Read Flora’s piece

Cast a Spell –  a timed exercise by Flora Dora

Read Flora’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read and discussed Mark Haddon’s novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. The novel’s title comes from a line of dialogue spoken by Sherlock Holmes in the story Silver Blaze.
I asked our writers to open their homework piece with the novel’s first line:
It was 7 minutes after midnight.

 

Time to Stop Worrying by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

7 Minutes after Midnight by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece 

7 Minutes after Midnight by Ray Dale

Read Ray’s piece

A Soldier’s Life by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

7 Minutes after Midnight by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

7 Minutes after Midnight by Lawrence Howard

Read Lawrence’s piece

The Show must go on by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

The Doll House – a timed exercise by Matthew Wells

Read Matthew’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read from High Fidelity by Nick Hornby…
 
High Fidelity isn’t really about music. “High fidelity” is just another phrase for commitment. So I asked our writers to write about someone who has a fear of commitment.

 

A Fear of Commitment by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

A Fear of Commitment by Debbie Holden 

Listen to Debbie reading her piece 

CIA! by Meredith Shepard

Read Meredith’s piece

Cafe name Truck and Stop by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

Afraid to Commit by Penny Humphrey

Read Penny’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read from The Witches of Eastwick by John Updike.

I asked the writers to use this line from the novel to open your homework:
The house had a forbidding, symmetrical face, with many windows that seemed slightly small – especially the third-storey row.

 

A Short Weekend in Dorset by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

Tea and Tiffin by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

The House by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

The House by Stuart Carruthers

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Final Judgement by Ray Dale

Read Ray’s piece

Mystery and Melancholy by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

The House by Joan Needham

Read Joan’s piece

Mrs Williams by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

Three Windmills by Katy Wise

Read Katy’s piece

Mockingbird Lane by Christina Buchanan

Read Christina’s piece

Oh to be a Goldfish by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

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April

For this week’s homework I read from The House of Sleep by Jonathan Coe and gave our writers a line from one of the chapters: It was their final quarrel, that much was clear.

The Send Off by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

Spinning out of control by Debbie Holden

Listen to Debbie reading her piece 

The Final Quarrel by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’ piece

The Police Bin by Sophie Groenendal

Listen to Ellis Goodwin reading Sophie’s piece

Final Quarrel by Mia Sundby

Read Mia’s piece

The Bitter Ending by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

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 The opening line of your homework comes from ‘Stiff Upper Lip Jeeves’.
I don’t know why it is but there’s something about being hauled off to a police bin that makes you feel a bit silly.

The Scotsword Puzzle by Jill Webb 

Listen to Jill reading her piece 

The Police Bin by Martin Bourne 

Read Martin’s piece

Monica’s Got Talent by Chris Robinson 

Read Monica’s piece

Success at Last by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

Between the Covers by Christina Buchanan

Read Christina’s piece

Guard Dog by Meredith Ann Shepard 

Read Meredith’s piece

It was all Greek to me by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read from Enduring Love by Ian McEwan, in which the protagonist suffers from De Clerambault Syndrome.
I asked our writers to open their homework piece with this line from Chapter 3 of Enduring Love:
By Six that evening we were back home, in our kitchen and everything looked the same.

By Six That Evening by June Posey

Read June’ piece

Obsessive Love by Joan Needham

Read Joan’s piece

By Six That Evening by Sophie Groenendal

Read Sophie’s piece

Absence by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

The New Kitchen by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina’s piece

Spot the Difference by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

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For this week’s homework I gave our writers the title of a short story by the 19th century American writer Kate Chopin – The Story of an Hour.

The Story of an Hour by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’ piece

The Story of an Hour by Katy Wise

Read Katy’s piece

The Story of an Hour by Mia Sundby

Read Mia’s piece

The Story of an Hour by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

The Story of an Hour by Miriam Silver

Read Miriam’s piece

The Story of an Hour by Sue Moore

Read Sue’s piece

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This week’s homework title – The Trip was inspired by Winter Garden by Beryl Bainbridge.https://www.theguardian.com/books/2002/jun/01/fiction.berylbainbridge
The opening line for the homework came from the book:
Something had gone wrong with the arrangements.

The Trip by Jill Webb 

Read Jill’s piece

Chaos in Rhyme by Ellis Goodwin 

Listen to Ellis reading his poem

The Trip by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

The Trip by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

The Trip by Ray Dale

Read Ray’s piece

The Trip by Christina Buchanan

Read Christina’s piece

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March

For this week’s homework I  read from Jazz by Toni Morrison. 

The latest Vintage edition of Jazz has an excellent forward by Morrison and its from here that the first two lines of the writers homework piece came from. ‘She sang, my Mother, the way other people muse. A constant background drift of beautiful sound I took for granted, like oxygen.’

The Place I Left Behind by Gill Kane

Listen to Gill’s piece

She Sang My Mother by Joan Needham

Read Joan’s piece

Hamelin, Tennessee by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

An Evening Butterfly by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

For Singing Outloud by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

She Sang my Mother by Chris Robinson

Read Chris’s piece

Eastern Province by Meredith Shepherd

Read Meredith’s piece

Father Gideon’s Journey by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina’s piece

Jazz by Fiona Dennis

Read Fiona’s piece

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For this week’s homework I asked the writers to use the title of a highly influential 1972 short story by the African American writer Toni Cade Bambara – The Lesson https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lesson_(short_story)

 

The Lesson by Sophie Groenendal

Read Sophie’s piece

Two Lessons by Des Holden

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The Lesson by Katy Wise

Read Katy’s piece

The Lesson by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

A Lesson from Edie by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

Just in Time by Edna Murdoch

Read Edna’s piece

The Lesson by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

The Lesson by Natalie Simmonds

Read Natalie’s piece

Nothing Ever Happens Here by Lesley Dawson

Read Lesley’s piece

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For this week’s homework I gave the writers the opening line from The Birds by Daphne du Maurier…On December third, the wind changed overnight and it was winter.  Note how specific Du Maurier is about the date, this implies the story has a past, but her real intent of course is to unsettle the reader. A Season arrives like a page turning in a book. What that might bring is the problem.

On December 3rd by Sophie Groenendal

Read Sophie’s piece

And it was Winter by Des Holden

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December 3rd by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

Her Winter of Discontent by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

Seascape by Christina Buchanan 

Read Christina’s piece

Uber Driver by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

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February

To set this week’s homework I gave the writers a line from Charlotte Bronte’s outstanding novel Villette – I often walked all day through the burning noon and the arid afternoon and the dusk evening and came back with moonrise.

I Often Walked All Day by Natalie Simmonds

Listen to Christina reading Natalie’s piece

I Often Walked All Day by Sophie Groenendal

Read Sophie’s piece

Now You Are Gone by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

I Often Walked All Day by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

Villette by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

I Often Walked All Day by Garf Collins 

Read Garf’s piece

I Often Walked All Day by Miriam Silver

Read Miriam’s piece

Bats by Christina Buchanan 

Read Christina’s piece

The Long Lonely Walk by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

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January

To set this week’s homework I gave the writers a title from a short story by the American writer Ottessa Moshvegh. Nothing Ever Happens Here. The first line for their piece came from Moshvegh’s brilliant debut novel Eileen. I was not myself back then. I was someone else.

I was Not Myself by Stuart Carruthers

Listen to Stuart reading his piece

Nothing ever happens here by Christina Buchanan

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Nothing ever happens here by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

Nothing ever happens here by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

Nothing ever happens here by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

No Catcalls by Meredith Shepard

Read Meredith’s piece

Panama by Mule by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

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To set this week’s homework I gave the writers a title from a short story by the Canadian writer Alice Munor – Something I’ve been meaning to tell you.

Not Now by Elaine Weddle

Read Elaine’s piece

Something I’ve been meaning to tell you by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

Something I’ve been meaning to tell you by Fiona Dennis

Read Fiona’s piece

Something I’ve been meaning to tell you by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

Something I’ve been meaning to tell you by Christina Buchanan

Read Christina’s piece

Something I’ve been meaning to tell you by Sarah Shipp

Listen to Sarah reading her piece 

Something I’ve been meaning to tell you by Sophie Groenendal

Read Sophie’s piece

Not Really There by Ellis Goodwin 

Listen to Ellis reading his piece 

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To set this week’s homework I read from England, England by Julian Barnes.  http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/05/09/daily/051199barnes-book-review.html
Then I asked our writers to use the first line from the novel:
“What’s your first memory?” someone would ask.

Clapham by Edna Murdoch

Listen to Edna reading her piece

A Long and Interesting Life by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece

What’s your first memory? by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

The Russian Doll – a timed exercise by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

According to Family Legend – a timed exercise by Natalie Simmonds 

Read Natalie’s piece

The Spanish Prisoner – a timed exercise by Christina Buchanan

Read Christina’s piece

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After discussing the prolific career of Alexandre Dumas I gave the writers The Fiction Factory as the title for their homework.

The Fiction Factory by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece

The Fiction Factory by Des Holden

Read Des’s piece

The Fiction Factory by Katy Wise

Read Katy’s piece

The Fiction Factory by Ludvig Solvang

Read Ludvig’s piece

The Fiction Factory by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

The Fiction Factory by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

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For the homework I read from An Encounter, the second short story in Dubliners by James Joyce. Read it here Bear in mind the date this was written, probably around 1904, yet its seems so fresh and contemporary. I asked our writers to open their homework piece to open with the first line from the story: It was Joe Dillon who introduced the Wild West to us.

The Great Unwashed by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece

Into the West by Stuart Carruthers

Read Stuart’s piece

Rodgers and Wreckers by Elaine Weddle 

Read Elaine’s piece

Sunday, Funday by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

Joe Dillon by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

Joe Dillon by Sophie Groenendal

Read Sophie’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read from the wonderful Alice Munro short story –  Walker Brothers Cowboy. Read it here I asked the writers to open their piece with the first line from the story. ‘After supper my Father says’.

After Supper by Stuart Carruthers

Listen to Stuart reading his poem

After Supper I Call Father by Elaine Weddle 

Read Elaine’s piece

After Supper Father My Says by Fran Duffield

Read Fran’s piece

Tacking to the Wind by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

Stand by your Man by Des Holden 

Read Des’s piece

Fair Play by Jill Webb

Read Jill’s piece

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To set this week’s homework I gave the writers a line from Anne Bronte’s preface to the second edition of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.

I wish to tell the truth, for truth always conveys its own moral to those who are able to receive it.

Truth and Lies by Des Holden 

Read Des’s piece

I Wish to tell the Truth by Debbie Holden

Read Debbie’s piece

Smoke by Izzy Wheeler

Read Izzy’s piece

Anaesthetic by Richard Wilding

Read Richard’s piece

Father Gideon’s Message by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece

I Wish to tell the Truth by Fran Duffield

Read Fran’s piece

The Truth by Gill Kane

Read Gill’s piece

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To set this week’s homework I played the workshop a clip of Alan Bennett reading from his short story, Father, Father Burning Bright. Listen to Alan Bennett reading from Father, Father, Burning Bright The homework title was The School Report.

The School Report by Miriam Silver

Read Miriam’s piece

The School Report by Martin Bourne

Read Martin’s piece

The School Report by Garf Collins

Read Garf’s piece

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For this week’s homework I read from Evening is the Whole Day by Preeta Samarasan. http://preetasamarasan.com I then asked the writers to use this line from the book as the last line of their piece:

For that is what miracles are like sometimes: quiet, unheralded, unglamorous to all but the beneficiary.

City Lights by Christina Buchanan

Listen to Christina reading her piece

 

  • The Familiar